Families & Children

    Results: 25

  • Bereaved Child Support Groups (1)
    PN-8100.1000-080

    Bereaved Child Support Groups

    PN-8100.1000-080

    Mutual support groups whose members are children and youth who have experienced the loss of a parent, sibling or other relative and need the emotional support of the group to alleviate feelings of isolation and a sense of responsibility for the loss. The groups may meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet.
  • Bereaved Parent Support Groups (3)
    PN-8100.1000-100

    Bereaved Parent Support Groups

    PN-8100.1000-100

    Mutual support groups whose members are parents who have experienced the loss of a child due to a miscarriage or stillbirth, or through illness or accident in infancy, during childhood or later in life. The groups meet in-person, by telephone or via the Internet; and focus on helping participants accept their loss, express their grief, move through the bereavement process and put their lives back together. Included are groups for parents who have lost a child to sudden infant death syndrome, or whose children have been murdered.
  • Boys/Girls Clubs (2)
    PS-9800.1000

    Boys/Girls Clubs

    PS-9800.1000

    Programs that provide a wide range of supervised recreational activities and delinquency prevention services for children and youth of all ages and backgrounds, but particularly for disadvantaged youth, through membership in boys and/or girls clubs. Club members are entitled to use recreational facilities and may have access to counseling, tutorial services, employment assistance, gang programs, drug abuse and alcoholism prevention and other activities and services that direct their energies toward positive social goals and facilitate healthy personality development.
  • Child Care Provider Referrals (2)
    PH-2400.1500

    Child Care Provider Referrals

    PH-2400.1500

    Programs that provide statewide and community-based services that are designed to improve the availability and quality of child care. These programs maintain lists of child care resources and link families who are in need of child care services with child care centers, licensed family child care homes and other organization-based providers; provide information that helps families become good consumers of child care services; recruit new child care providers to expand the availability of the service locally; provide training and technical assistance for providers; and collect and disseminate data which document the demand for child care services and the current availability of child care resources. Some programs may also make referrals to preschools and many provide referrals to children's play groups.
  • Child Care Providers (1)
    PH-1250

    Child Care Providers

    PH-1250

    Programs that provide substitute parental care in a group setting for children during some portion of a 24-hour day. Services may include recreational and developmental activities and snacks and/or meals as appropriate.
  • Children's Protective Services (1)
    PH-6500.1500

    Children's Protective Services

    PH-6500.1500

    Programs that investigate reports of child abuse, neglect or abandonment; document substantiated cases; provide for the temporary placement of children who, for their own protection, have been removed from the custody of the adults who are responsible for their care; work with families who are experiencing a problem with child abuse with the objective of facilitating continued family unification or reunification; and provide ongoing supportive services for children in permanent placement.
  • Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays (5)
    LR-1700

    Early Intervention for Children With Disabilities/Delays

    LR-1700

    Programs that identify infants, toddlers and in some cases, preschoolers who show evidence of or are at risk for lags in physical development, cognitive development, language and speech development, psychosocial development or self-help skills, and provide or coordinate the delivery of an enrichment program in order to minimize the potential for a developmental delay and to meet their current developmental needs. The program may include early identification activities (child find); a developmental evaluation; a review of family concerns, priorities and resources; meetings with the family to develop an individualized family service plan; service coordination to ensure that the individual and his or her family receive needed services which may include but are not limited to physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, health/medical services, nursing services, nutrition services, psychological services including specialized play groups or therapy sessions, counseling, speech and language assistance, special instructional services, transportation, and parenting skills development; and ongoing evaluation of the child's progress and his or her changing enrichment needs. Included are "birth to three" programs and federal, state or local programs that address the needs of slightly older children or children not otherwise eligible for "birth to three" programs.
  • Early Intervention for Mental Illness (1)
    RR-1800

    Early Intervention for Mental Illness

    RR-1800

    Programs that identify and provide treatment for individuals whose personal condition and social experiences could potentially produce mental, emotional or social dysfunctions with the objective of preventing their development; or which conduct general screening efforts to identify and treat children who have emerging problems to ensure the best possible prognosis.
  • Family Based Services (7)
    PH-2360

    Family Based Services

    PH-2360

    Programs that provide a wide variety of social services that are designed to support healthy family development, improve the family's ability to resolve problems (such as poverty, unemployment, ill health, homelessness, substandard housing, educational difficulties, substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, delinquency and physical and developmental problems) and prevent the need for unnecessary placement of children in foster care, group homes, inpatient substance abuse or mental health treatment programs, residential training schools or other alternative environments when family problems reach crisis proportions. Services may include home visiting services that focus on public health issues (especially prenatal), mental health and substance abuse counseling, home management instruction, success in a child care setting, parenting skills development, stress management, tutoring, pregnancy awareness and AIDS awareness; may be available to the community at large, to families at risk for dissolution or those currently in crisis; and may be offered by a single agency or a coalition of agencies that have agreed to provide services according to a coordinated case plan.
  • Family Counseling (4)
    RF-2000

    Family Counseling

    RF-2000

    Programs that offer therapeutic sessions that focus on the system of relationships and communication patterns among family members and which attempt to modify those relationships and patterns to achieve greater harmony. The therapist focuses on the family as a unit rather than concentrating on one of the members who is singled out as the person in need of treatment.
  • Family Planning (3)
    LJ-2000

    Family Planning

    LJ-2000

    Programs that provide assistance for people who want to control the size of their families and the spacing of their children, usually through some form of birth control; who want to explore options for conceiving; who have a problem with infertility; or who have questions about the advisability of becoming pregnant or following through with a current pregnancy.
  • Family Violence Prevention (3)
    FN-1500.1900

    Family Violence Prevention

    FN-1500.1900

    Programs that attempt to reduce the incidence of child abuse, elder abuse and spouse abuse in family settings through a variety of educational interventions which may focus on children of various ages, parents, people who work with families and/or the community at large.
  • Food Stamps/SNAP (1)
    NL-6000.2000

    Food Stamps/SNAP

    NL-6000.2000

    A federally-funded program administered locally by the county or the state that enables low-income and indigent households to obtain an electronic benefit transfer (EBT) card similar to a bank debit card which can be used in most grocery stores to purchase food. Approved households are entitled to purchase a designated amount of food utilizing their cards based on net income and household size. Benefits are generally available in an EBT account within 30 days from the date an application was filed. Expedited food stamps are available within seven days for people who are in an emergency situation and whose income and spendable resources for that month are within specified limits.
  • Food Supplements (2)
    BD-1800.8200-200

    Food Supplements

    BD-1800.8200-200

    Programs that provide liquid nutrition supplements for older adults and/or people with disabilities who, for medical reasons, are unable to derive sufficient nutrients from a regular diet. Also included are programs that provide high calorie liquid supplements needed by cancer patients and others who have difficulty swallowing, digesting or keeping solid foods down.
  • Foster Grandparent Program (1)
    ND-9200.8000-200

    Foster Grandparent Program

    ND-9200.8000-200

    Programs that provide part-time opportunities for low-income individuals age 60 and older to serve as mentors, tutors and caregivers for abused or neglected children, troubled youth, or youngsters with disabilities or other special needs in schools, hospitals, child care programs, Head Start programs and residential settings. Foster grandparents receive a modest tax-free stipend for their work as well as reimbursements for their travel expenses, and have the satisfaction of helping young people grow, gain confidence, and become more productive members of society. Local nonprofit organizations and public agencies receive grants to sponsor and operate local Foster Grandparent projects. The Foster Grandparents Program is part of Senior Corps, a network of programs administered by the Corporation for National and Community Service.
  • Foster Homes for Dependent Children (2)
    PH-6300.2000

    Foster Homes for Dependent Children

    PH-6300.2000

    Programs that provide alternative family living arrangements in agency-supervised private family homes for children and youth who have been neglected, abused or abandoned in situations where a children's protective services worker or a court has decided that they cannot live safely at home.
  • Parent Support Groups (4)
    PN-8100.6500-650

    Parent Support Groups

    PN-8100.6500-650

    Mutual support groups for parents who share a common characteristic or circumstance such as being single parents, dual career parents, multiple birth parents, parents with children who are out of control, or parents of children with disabilities, who come together for educational and social purposes as well as for mutual support. Meeting formats may include in-person, telephone or Internet options.
  • Parent to Parent Networking (1)
    PH-1400.6500-650

    Parent to Parent Networking

    PH-1400.6500-650

    Programs that link parents whose children have a specific disease, disorder, disability or other issues with other parents whose children have similar challenges for the purpose of information sharing and support. Also included are programs for parents who themselves have a disability or other problems that have an impact on their parenting ability.
  • Parenting Education (9)
    PH-6100

    Parenting Education

    PH-6100

    Programs that provide classes, workshops or other educational opportunities for parents or potential parents who want to acquire the knowledge and skills to be effective in their parenting role.
  • Postpartum Care (1)
    LJ-5000.6500

    Postpartum Care

    LJ-5000.6500

    Programs that provide follow-up medical care for women during the first six weeks following delivery to ensure that they are recovering normally from childbirth.
  • Sexuality/Reproductive Health Education (1)
    LJ-8000

    Sexuality/Reproductive Health Education

    LJ-8000

    Programs that provide information about the physiological and emotional aspects of human sexuality including anatomy and physiology, puberty, pregnancy, birth control, sexually transmitted disease and the subsequent risk of infertility, menopause and the attitudes, feelings and behaviors that are related to sexuality for people of all ages.
  • WIC (2)
    NL-6000.9500

    WIC

    NL-6000.9500

    A federally-funded program that provides nutrition education and food vouchers for pregnant women, new mothers, infants and children younger than age five who cannot afford an adequate diet and, in the case of infants older than six weeks of age, who have a condition which shows a need for better nutrition. Vouchers are picked up at a WIC site (which are usually located in an health center that provides maternity and/or pediatric care) on a monthly basis and may be exchanged for milk, cheese, eggs, cereal, juice, vegetables, peanut butter, beans and formula in most grocery stores. In some states, WIC benefits are made available through electronic transfer benefit (EBT) cards.
  • Youth Centers (2)
    TC-5500.9800

    Youth Centers

    TC-5500.9800

    Multipurpose centers that serve as a focal point for youth in the community and which offer, at a single location, a wide variety of services and activities that are needed by and of interest to this population.
  • Youth Enrichment Programs (3)
    PS-9800.9900

    Youth Enrichment Programs

    PS-9800.9900

    Programs that offer a wide variety of activities including arts and crafts, academic programs, sports, reading clubs, workshops and other recreational, leisure, cultural, social and civic activities for school-age children and youth in out-of-school hours. The objective of youth enrichment programs is to promote healthy social interaction and help participants maximize their social, emotional, physical and academic potential.
  • Youth Violence Prevention (2)
    FN-1500.9700

    Youth Violence Prevention

    FN-1500.9700

    Programs that attempt to reduce the incidence of violent acts committed by youth on the streets, in the schools or in other settings through a variety of educational interventions which may focus on children of various ages, parents, people who work with families, the schools, health care providers, law enforcement officials and/or the community at large. The program may provide information about model/promising prevention and intervention programs and crisis response strategies; descriptions of the risk factors associated with youth violence; research including statistics on violence committed by and against children and teens; outreach; and/or presentations that may be tailored for a variety of audiences.
 
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